David's Blog

The Road to Madhapur

Chek out the latest media on The Road to Madhapur

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With the official book launch just ten days away, media interest in The Road to Madhapur has taken off. Following the Radio New Zealand broadcast, I gave a far-reaching Q&A interview with NZ Booklovers:
David Whittet talks about The Road to Madhapur.

NZ Booklovers have also reviewed The Road to Madhapur:
The Road to Madhapur by David Whittet

Flaxroots have posted an in-depth review:
Author’s experience makes a believable novel

And if you haven't already, check out my article on achieving our life goals as we grow older.
It’s Never too late to follow your dreams - David Whittet - Grownups

The Road to Madhapur Book Trailer



Check out this dramatic book trailer and experience The Road to Madhapur in sixty glorious seconds!

Join us for The Road to Madhapur Book Launch

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Join us for The Road to Madhapur book launch at The Business Hive in Oamaru on Tuesday 29 November at 7pm. I will be signing books and reading from The Road to Madhapur.

All welcome. Register you interest here.

The Road to Madhapur on Radio New Zealand

I talked about The Road to Madhapur and my author journey on Radio New Zealand’s Standing Room Only show this afternoon.

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Listen to the interview here:

The Road to Madhapur Giveaway at Grown Ups

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Grown Ups, the social magazine that connects New Zealand’s 50+ community are giving away two signed copies of The Road to Madhapur. If you’re fifty or over, sign up here! The Road to Madhapur Giveaway

While visiting the Grown Ups site, check out my article on following your dreams. It’s Never to Late to Follow your Dreams

The Road to Madhapur Cover Reveal


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Over the past month, I have worked with the extraordinarily talented Holly Dunn on the cover design for The Road to Madhapur. The process has proved a fantastic journey of discovery. From Holly's initial concept art to the finished product, each stage brought fresh vitality and a true reflection of the spirit of my story.

You're terrific, Holly! I am proud to have your work on my cover.

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Linger Means Longer

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My brilliant manuscript assessor, Caroline Baron, invariably urges me to 'linger' and 'go deeper' at critical points in the story. I have just finished a complete rewrite of The Road to Madhapur following Caroline's assessment. Linger definitely does mean longer. Before Caroline's review, the manuscript stood at 110,000 words. Now it's up to 140,000 words!

Caroline forever challenges me, and her enthusiasm for my work and inspiration has made me a better writer. Going deeper has undoubtedly made The Road to Madhapur more compelling. I just have to figure out how to get the word count down!

Joy in a Leper Colony

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Writing about the real-life events that took place during my time working in India brings back vivid memories. I will never forget the smiles on the children’s faces. They had nothing but their cheerfulness and unrestrained optimism convinced me of the indomitability of the human spirit.
A leper colony plays a pivotal role in The Road to Madhapur. A place of overwhelming sorrow, despair and heartbreak. Yet beyond the suffering, I found hope and joy. Fulfilment and peace. That leprosy mission was among the happiest places I have seen in my life. I hope I can get that exhilaration across in my writing.

The Road to Madhapur

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Sincere thanks to everyone who responded to my previous post with such imaginative suggestions for the title of my new novel.
After much soul-searching, I have finally chosen a name for the project that reflects the thrust of the story. In the early chapters we meet a disaffected New Zealand doctor and an Australian missionary's daughter, both headed for the remote township of Madhapur in the Odisha state of India. Despite wholly different backgrounds and expectations, we sense from the outset that their worlds will collide. Caught up in the turbulent world of Indian politics and a community in crisis, tragedy propels their lives on an inescapable trajectory.
The real-life incidents depicted in The Road to Madhapur had a profound effect on me. With the first draft of the book now in the hands of my early reviewers, I am delighted that they are finding these life-changing events equally touching.

The Good Karma Well

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For the second time in my life, I have been pipped at the post. I recently started work on a new novel about a disillusioned young doctor who goes to work in India. After a Bollywood style romance with a missionary’s daughter ends in tragedy, he dedicates himself to building a well for the impoverished community. While a work of fiction and not autobiographical, the novel draws on my own experiences working in India and the story incorporates many real-life events.
I thought I had struck gold when I came up with the title The Good Karma Well for my book. Until I turned on the television and saw a trailer for a programme called The Good Karma Hospital.
Beaten to it again! Back in the 1980’s, I wrote a screenplay about two brothers, one of whom was autistic. This was to be my magnum opus as a filmmaker. Taking a break from preproduction, a friend urged me to see Rain Man in the cinema. The similarities with my story were heartbreaking. Nobody would believe that developed my script before seeing Rain Man. I put the project on the shelf and found it hard to get enthusiastic about another project for some time.
Although The Good Karma Hospital features a young doctor finding herself in an under-resourced and overworked hospital in India, my story is entirely different in concept and content. I need a new title to distinguish my book from the television series. I have given the project the working title of Namaste while I search for something more striking. The Namaste Well doesn't have quite the same ring to it. Any suggestions for an arresting title will be gratefully received!